Our Paediatric Dietitian Rebecca Weeks visited primary school children at Sholing Infant School and presented our healthy eating workshop. Teaching pupils how to eat well by identifying healthy meal choices and exploring different food groups, Rebecca introduced the children to the Eatwell plate and explained the importance of a balanced diet.

The session started with a game of ‘food lucky dip’  with pupils picking fruit, vegetables, bread and sugary snacks out of a mystery box.  Pupils were then asked questions about food providence such as:

  • What is this food called?
  • Have you ever eaten it?
  • What does this food feel like?

Pupils were very perceptive when it came to exploring the foods we’d bought to the session. Interestingly lentils and parsnips were the least known food type. The children asked lots of questions and engaged in group discussions. Even the little ones! Why not teach your children about healthy eating with our top tips below.

Tip one make introducing new foods fun and get your child as involved as possible. Whether it be taking them to do the food shop, getting them to point out specific fruit and vegetables, to letting them loose in the kitchen.

In our healthy eating session, we asked children to share with the group which foods they tried at home, and everyone explored their favourite foods and where these foods come from. There were mixed reviews from children, on what their friends were eating at home.  Some were surprised to hear that their friends were eating aubergine or carrots and some just said: “yuck, I don’t like that!”.

Tip two is to be patient; children will come round to new foods eventually….. promise. It’s been reported that children will need to try new foods anywhere from 7 to 15 times before acquiring a taste for it.

Taster time! Mango and sugar-snap peas were given out as tasters at the end of our healthy eating session, for the children to try and report back to us. These went down a treat, and we had children coming back for seconds.

Tip three you can easily recreate our Mango and sugar-snap peas at home. Again, make it fun – you could even make your children cover their eyes when trying the foods. Ask them questions such as, what do you think it is? How does it feel? A point for each correct answer.

We know it’s hard to believe that your child will ever like new foods, but as they become an accustomed food taster, they will want to try more and more foods.

Over to you

Need some quick and easy, nutritious recipes to for your little ones? Check out our recipes page.

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